HAWAC Research Papers | Judson University Christian College

Research Papers


Name:

Harm A. Weber academic center, post-occupancy building performance and comfort perceptions

Authors:

Keelan P. Kaiser, David M. Ogoli, PhD, and Malcolm Cook, PhD

Abstract:

The Weber Center at Judson University, a mixed mode, naturally ventilated building in a continental climate, has been in operation for just over a year, with initial occupancy in August 2007. This paper compares the design objectives and building performance expectations against the first year of actual energy consumption in a first of a series of post-occupancy evaluations. The paper contrasts the building performance with general user satisfaction and perceptions of comfort through a post- occupancy evaluation of user surveys and interviews. The innovations involved in this building, particularly mechanical strategies atypical in contemporary practice within this climate and region, have introduced some interesting problems that have been documented in the post-occupancy evaluation process, while confirming many of the original intentions of the design.

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Name:

The Harm A. Weber Academic Center and the Greening of Judson University

Authors:

Keelan P. Kaiser, David M. Ogoli, PhD

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Name:

Exploiting a hybrid environmental design strategy in a US continental climate

Authors:

C. Alan Short and Kevin J. Lomas

Abstract:

Resistance to the widespread adoption of naturally ventilated buildings in North America derives from the exigencies of the ‘continental climate’ type: humid hot summers and cold, desiccating winters. The paper describes a proposed new hybrid strategy for conditioning the environment in the new library and faculty building for Judson College, Elgin, Illinois, US. The strategy exploits the significant mid-season opportunities for implementing natural buoyancy-driven displacement ventilation and passive cooling in the continental climate of the Chicago hinterland. Both the natural and mechanical modes of operation are described and put in the context of current thermal comfort criteria for wholly mechanical and wholly natural ventilation. Predictions are given of the annual duration of the various operating modes and the building’s likely overall energy performance using a standard reference year. Construction and energy costs are compared with those for a US Standard Building. An account is given of the various barriers encountered in introducing the innovations.

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Low energy architecture for a severe US climate: Design and evaluation of a hybrid ventilation strategy

Authors:

Kevin J. Lomas, Malcolm J. Cook, Dusan Fiala

Abstract:

Natural ventilation, relying on openings in the facade, is applicable to a limited range of climates, sites and building types. Advanced naturally ventilated buildings, such as those using stacks to encourage buoyancy driven airflow, or hybrid buildings, which integrate both natural and mechanical systems, can extend the range of buildings and climate within which natural ventilation might be used.

This paper describes the design of a new library building for a college, located near Chicago, which uses a new hybrid ventilation concept despite the severe continental climate. The likely operation of the building is illustrated using dynamic thermal modeling and computational fluid dynamics analyses. The new building challenges ingrained preconceptions about building designs for severe climates and exposes barriers to low energy buildings posed by national standards and guidelines.
2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Name:

Architectural design of an advanced naturally ventilated building form

Author:

Kevin J. Lomas

Abstract:

Advanced stack-ventilated buildings have the potential to consume much less energy for space conditioning than typical mechanically ventilated or air-conditioned buildings. This paper describes how environmental design considerations in general, and ventilation considerations in particular, shape the architecture of advanced naturally ventilated (ANV) buildings. The attributes of simple and advanced naturally ventilated buildings are described and a taxonomy of ANV buildings presented. Simple equations for use at the preliminary design stage are presented. These produce target structural cross section areas for the key components of ANV systems. The equations have been developed through practice-based research to design three large educational buildings: the Frederick Lanchester Library, Coventry, UK; the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London, UK; the Harm A. Weber Library, Elgin, near Chicago, USA. These buildings are briefly described and the sizes of the as-built ANV features compared with the target values for use in preliminary design. The three buildings represent successive evolutionary stages: from advanced natural ventilation, to ANV with passive downdraught cooling, and finally ANV with HVAC support. Hopefully the guidance, simple calculation tools and case study examples will give architects and environmental design consultants confidence to embark on the design of ANV buildings.
2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Name:

Experimental and Theoretical Modeling of Natural Ventilation in Judson College, Elgin, Illinois

Authors:

Andrew Woods and Shaun Fitzgerald

Abstract:

In this report we describe a series of laboratory experiments and supporting theoretical models in which we have explored the potential for natural ventilation in the new Library Building at Judson College. In particular, we have focused on the potential for natural ventilation driven through the double façade system and on the potential for solar heating in the façade to assist the ventilation. The experiments and modeling indicate the potential for this design to work effectively, and has been used in the design and development of the façade system for the actual building. We also report on some experiments in which we have explored different designs for the termination for the stacks, so as to optimise the benefits of both wind-driven ventilation and buoyancy driven flow. Our work has been implemented in the design of the building through a series of meetings with Alan Short, Adam Whitely and Lauren Scully of Short and Associates.

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Name:

Judson College Library: Airflow Modeling 2

Authors:

M.J. Cook, K.J. Lomas, I. Abdalla and S.J. Rees

Abstract:

This report describes the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions for the library zone of the new building proposed at Judson College. The work continues that which was reported in.

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